Epidemiologic transition in maternal mortality and morbidity: New challenges for Jamaica

This study, reported in the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, sought to determine the incidence and causes of maternal deaths in Jamaica for 1998–2003 through record reviews. Maternal mortality declined after maternal mortality surveillance began in 1981–1983, largely due to 24% fewer hypertension deaths that followed the introduction of clinical guidelines and reorganization of antenatal services. Hemorrhagic deaths declined by 36% with the introduction of plasma expanders. However, indirect mortality grew: Increases due to HIV/AIDS, cardiac disease, sickle cell disease, and asthma suggest the need to improve collaboration with medical teams to implement guidelines to care for pregnant women with chronic diseases.

McCaw-Binns A, SF Alexander , JLM Lindo, C Escoffery, K Spence, K Lewis-Bell, and G Lewis, “Epidemiologic transition in maternal mortality and morbidity: New challenges for Jamaica,” International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 96(2007):226–232.

Publication Date 
October 2007
Authors 
McCaw-Binns A, SF Alexander , JLM Lindo, C Escoffery, K Spence, K Lewis-Bell, and G Lewis
Resource Type 
Publications
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles