TB Program South Africa Spotlights Its Small Grants Program in New Report

URC’s USAID-supported TB Program South Africa has released a report highlighting best practices and lessons learned from managing its small grants program. The report describes the project’s efforts to promote community-based management of TB throughout South Africa and celebrates the successes of our partner NGOs there. The case studies covered in the report reveal the commitment of NGO-supported community health workers and their role in filling TB service delivery gaps in their communities. 

Jacqueline Peters is an exemplary community health worker whose dedication and activities are highlighted in the report. She works with the NGO Touching Nations in Western Cape as a DOTS-[Directly Observed Treatment, Short course] supporter: a community health worker who is responsible for visiting patients at home daily and 

observing them as they take their TB medicine. She reveals in the report how passionate she

is about her work: “I love to work. I like to go to my clients’ houses and see how they are. . . . There was one lady who had MDR [multidrug-resistant TB]. She was sitting in the house and didn’t want to go out because she was afraid that people would think she’s the one [that] infected them. I started going to her house and getting her to come out for fresh air. Now she walks [regularly].” Ms. Peters’ commitment to her community is contributing to her success, as she also reports that “all of my clients have been cured of TB. Nobody died.”  

The small grants program began in 2009 and has funded more than 41 NGOs in all nine of South Africa’s provinces. These NGOs perform a range of technical activities that involve:

  • Identifying TB suspects and referring them for screening, diagnosis, and treatment;
  • Tracing defaulters and contacts;
  • Creating community support to help patients stay on treatment;
  • Reducing stigma and encouraging people to seek testing and treatment early;
  • Strengthening community-level advocacy, communication, and social mobilization on TB and HIV; and
  • Strengthening services for TB-HIV co-infected people.

From 2009-2011, the funded NGOs have: 

  • Reached more than 950,000 people through TB and HIV communication and awareness-raising activities (at schools, churches, workplaces, and through door-to-door campaigns);
  • Screened more than 370,000 people for TB;
  • Identified approximately 28,000 TB suspects;
  • Offered HIV counseling and testing to 15,000 TB patients; and 
  • Tested 8,000 TB patients for HIV.

The TB Program South Africa will use the information documented in the report to guide its small grants implementation in the coming year.

The TB Program South Africa awarded a small grant to the Amakhumbuza Community Development and Healthcare Centre to provide TB and HIV services in KwaZulu Natal.
The TB Program South Africa awarded a small grant to the Amakhumbuza Community Development and Healthcare Centre to provide TB and HIV services in KwaZulu Natal.
Date 
November 05, 2013
Authors 
Colleen Longacre, URC Project Coordinator
Regions/ Countries