Improved Cookstoves Received Positively by Ugandan Women, USAID Study Finds

New findings from a focus group funded through URC's Translating Research into Action (TRAction) Project shows that women in Uganda preferred improved, energy-efficient wood stoves to traditional cooking methods. The women said that new stoves produced less smoke, used less wood, and cooked foods faster.

The focus group aimed to test strategies to increase the number of people who buy and correctly use improved, cleaner-burning wood stoves in rural Uganda. California-based Impact Carbon led the focus groups.

The TRAction project, funded by the US Agency for International Development, supports the development and evaluation of behavioral approaches to tackle household air pollution and recently awarded $1.3 million to three groups, including Impact Carbon, to find ways to reduce pollution exposure in Uganda and India.

Half of the world's population cooks with solid fuels on poorly functioning stoves or open fires, primarily using wood or other biomass. Nearly 2 million people, mostly women and children, die each year as a consequence of household air pollution levels that are typically 100 times greater than World Health Organization air quality guidelines.

Over the coming months, Impact Carbon's research team will continue to work with community members in rural Uganda to identify methods for promoting the improved cookstoves that most effectively encourage families to buy the stoves and use them correctly for a long period of time.

Women and their families test an improved cookstove at a focus group meeting in Uganda. Photo credit: Impact Carbon.
Women and their families test an improved cookstove at a focus group meeting in Uganda. Photo credit: Impact Carbon.
Date 
January 12, 2012
Authors 
Theresa Beltramo, Johanna Young, and Sarah Whitmarsh
Regions/ Countries